close
close

The abandoned lost village that was once home to more than 200 people

The abandoned lost village that was once home to more than 200 people

The 17th-century mansion and gorgeous acres of ancient landscape parkland on the Wimpole Estate also hides secrets from history

The North facade of Wimpole Hall, National Trust Stately Home, Cambridgeshire(Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Archeologists have discovered evidence of lost villages dating back to before the 1500s in the Cambridgeshire countryside.

The 17th-century mansion and gorgeous acres of ancient landscape parkland on the Wimpole Estate also hides secrets from history.

The estate was home to several local families who worked the land and had a thriving rural village community, Cambridgeshire Live reports.

Cambridge Archaeology Field Group (CAFG) have spent 15 years investigating what lies beneath the surface of the Wimpole estate and the surrounding arable fields where once villages had existed.

They have discovered not only evidence of a prehistoric past in the form of Neolithic tools but also evidence of these lost villages and the families who called them home.

Gothic Tower on Johnson’s Hill on the Wimpole Estate(PA)

The earliest record of the parish now on the current Wimpole Estate is in the Domesday Book of 1086. The land was divided between two landowners: Earl Gyrth and Eddeva the Fair. Much of the parish was arable farmland.

However, not much is known about the details of the villagers until 1560 when the parish registers of baptisms, marriages and burials started. From these documents, it has been discovered that some of the earliest names of families that lived there are Mawlden, More, Pratt, Tyton, Semer and Brocke.

See also  Storms Cause Road Flooding in North West Texas

See also  Late collapse leaves Livingston heading for more challenging rebuild than should have been needed
  • June 25, 2023